Lantana's Little List

Lantana Public Library's blog

Archive for the ‘Fiction’ Category

Delighting in books…a’ mire ri leabhraichean

leave a comment »

WorldofIce_Fire Gabaldon_outlander.pngCornwell_LastKingdomCulloden.png

Attention Game of Thrones, The Last Kingdom, and Outlander TV show fans!

After the cable Watchathon Week free viewing these popular shows ends, I’m hoping to (re)read some of these…please come check them out or head over to our e-book Overdrive to find them!  (Overdrive users, select Lantana Public Library and enter in your library card number.)

We’ve got several of George Martin’s Game of Thrones series (all in Overdrive):
*Game of Thrones                                                      *A Dance with Dragons (also in the library)
*A Clash of Kings                                                        *A Storm of Swords
*A Feast for Crows                                                          *A Knight of the Seven Kingdoms
*A world of fire and ice:the untold history of Westeros and Game of Thrones  — on the history (in the library under F Mar)

*Rogues (an anthology of 21 stories) (edited with Gardner Dezois)

Diana Gabaldon’s Outlander series (all under F Gal):
*Outlander (F Gal) (in the library and Overdrive)     *Dragonfly in Amber (in Overdrive)
*Voyager (Overdrive)                                                         *Drums of Autumn (in Overdrive)
*The Fiery Cross (in Overdrive)                             *A Breath of Snow and Ashes (in Overdrive)
*An echo in the bone (in the library and Overdrive)
*Written in my own heart’s blood (in the library and Overdrive)

In addition, we’ve some of Gabaldon’s Lord John Grey Series –a subset of the Outlander series:
*Lord John and the Private Matter, a novel (in the library)
*Lord John and the Brotherhood of the Blade (in the library)
*The Scottish Prisoner (in the library)

Bernard Cornwell has written a series of Saxon Chronicle books, following Uhtred Ragnarson of Bebbanburg, a young Saxon kidnapped and raised by raiding Danish Vikings, and who eventually comes to fight for King Alfred of Wessex. All are available in the library (under F Cor):
*The Last Kingdom                                *The Pale Horseman
*Lords of the North                                *Sword Song
*The Burning Land                               *The Empty Throne      
*Warriors of the Storm

Advertisements

Written by lantanalister1

April 22, 2016 at 8:23 pm

New Fiction Spring 2016 at Lantana Public Library

leave a comment »

New Fiction Spring 2016
at Lantana Public Library
205 West Ocean Ave, Lantana, FL
Ph: 561-540-5740
www.lantanalibrary.org

The Storied Life of A.J. Fikry by Gabrielle Zevin (F Zev)
About a bookstore and its ups and downs, as well as those of its owner, who unexpectedly gains the chance to make his life anew.
Zebra Crossing by Meg Vandermerwe (F Van)
Young Chipo and her brother George flee from Zimbabwe to Cape Town and its infamous Long Street, as illegals, and soon get entangled with the sinister Dr. Ongani and his get-rich-quick schemes.
Rules for a Knight: The Last Letter of Sir Thomas Lemuel Hawke by Ethan Hawke (F Haw)
A knight writes a letter to his children to leave a record on all of what he knows, including morals, ancient teachings, political and spiritual writings.
The Swede by Robert Karjel (F Kar)
Swedish security officer Ernest Grip gets sent, along with American counterpart Shauna Friedman,  to interrogate a detainee and find his true identity, only to uncover a strange network of international, unrelated suspects.
An Irish Doctor in Love and at Sea by Patrick Taylor (F Tay)
Continuing the story of Irish Dr. Fingal O’Reilly, returning to Ballybuckleboo in Northern Ireland after serving in World War II on the HMS Warspite, to face challenges in a new medical partnership.  With real and fictional characters, this is a must-read for James Herriot fans.
The Swans of Fifth Avenue by Melanie Benjamin
A novel about Babe Paley, a glamorous New York socialite of the 1950s, and her relationship with literary legend Truman Capote.
A Strangeness in My Mind by Orhan Pamuk (F Pam)
An unforgettable tale of Istanbul street vendor, Mevluut Karatas, the love of his life, his coming of age in a great city, and the differences of his mind and feelings.
The Last September by Nina de Gramant (F Gra)
Charlie and Brett are living in Cape Cod with their daughter, tenuously married, until a tragic turn of events tests their loyalty and love.
Shanghai Redemption by Qui Xialong (F Qui)
Inspector Chen Chao of the Shanghai Police has been promoted to a new position with little power, and placed in charge of a doomed, dangerous  investigation of a  ruthless, powerful, high-level Party figure.

Written by lantanalister1

April 13, 2016 at 6:11 pm

Posted in Book Corner, Fiction

New reading at the Library this fall 2015

leave a comment »

Hi everyone…We’ve some great new reading for you this fall 2015!  Please come to the Library to check them out.  Some of these you won’t find easily at other libraries around here.

An overview of some of them can be seen here: Publication FALL 2015 reads

We also have new books in history, business, and social sciences.

To search for a book, see our new KOHA on-line catalog at http://lantana.bywatersolutions.com/

Fall2015 Reads EntireBrochurePublication FALL 2015 reads_2

 

Written by lantanalister1

September 25, 2015 at 4:07 pm

with one comment

256px-Anthony_Trollope

Anthony Trollope by Frederick Waddy

Trollope Trending by Adam Gopnik
The New Yorker, May 4, 2015
Did you enjoy Andrew Greeley’s Cardinal Sins?  Or, perhaps, you follow(ed) West Wing or presently House of Cards and Madam Secretary on TV?   Then, Anthony Trollope is likely a writer you should read. Trollope faithfully chronicled and satirized the everyday life of the clergy, as well as bureaucrats and politicians in England.

Trollope, claims Adam Gopnik, understands how power divided and diffused among various office holders’ voices and bodies,   “is not just an aspect of politics – it is a precondition of politics…with the hum of gossip and backbiting.”   More than many of us, Trollope is interested in how ambivalent and confusing the forces of change can be, and how compromise and painful growth form much of that change. Trollope tackles this theme through entirely invented worlds, characters, and institutions grappling with modernization of a particular kind and the impositions of efficiency and accountability.  As Gopnik writes:

In Trollope’s fiction, even the most small-scale and homely stories have as a background this special crisis of modernization—not the crisis of industrialization and mass immiseration, seen by Dickens, but a crisis of institutions, produced by reform and standardization…[T]he agents of reform are often ugly, that the beneficiaries of corruption are often graceful, that the effects of reform are often dubious, but that reform in a liberal society is nonetheless as inevitable as the standardization of measurement.

The characters of Trollope’s Barsetshire novels — including the characters of parish newcomer Mr. Harding (The Warden), Bishop Proudie and his wife, Dr. Stanhope or Mr. Quiverful – could all exist on a modern university campus in various roles, according to Gopnik — ranging from university president to lowly adjunct instructor.  In the Palliser novels, outsider Irish lawyer Phineas Finn rises through the British political system to become a British MP and later Cabinet member, through relations formed with others, as well as with ambition, charm, favors, and luck.

Trollope could very well help Americans understand their current political landscape, populated as it is by die-hard radicals on either side of the spectrum, reactionaries, moderates, as well as middling careerists and interest groups.  If he were still alive today, claims Gopnik, he’d no doubt be comically depicting the European Parliament in Brussels – or other powerful institutions.

Lantana Public Library, by the way, has many of Trollope’s works, including these:

Palliser Novels The Duke’s Children Phineas Finn Phineas Redux The Eustace Diamonds The Prime Minister Can You  Forgive Her? Barset Novels The Warden Doctor Thorpe Framley parsonage Barchester Towers The Last Chronicle of Barset
Dramatic/Comic Novels The Claverings Dr. Wortle’s School Lady Anna Orley Farm Ralph the Heir Rachel Ray Miss Mackenzie The Way We Live Now Irish & overseas novels The Bertrams An Eye For an Eye Short stories Kept in the Dark

Written by lantanalister1

July 5, 2015 at 7:08 pm

Posted in Book Corner, Fiction

Tagged with , , , ,

New: How to Get Filthy Rich in Rising Asia by Moshin Hamid

leave a comment »

How to Get Filthy Rich in Rising Asia
by Moshin Hamid

How to Get Filthy Rich in Rising Asia_Hamid

[Hardcover] 228 pages
ISBN: 978-1-59448-729-3
Lantana Call No. F Ham

What a strange, funny, jaw-dropping read this book was.  It’s a story of a young South Asian man in twelve acts doubling satirically as a self-help book.

The twelve acts or parts sum it all up far better than anything I could write here in this review.  Some of these should sound familiar:

One: Move to the City
Two: Get an Education
Three: Don’t Fall in Love
Four: Avoid Idealists
Five: Learn from a Master
…etc.

By the story’s end, simple beginnings have become complex lives (only perhaps to end suddenly).

Moreover, use of 2nd person narration (where the man/narrator addresses readers as “you,”) renders the views of events ironic and somewhat impersonal, and yet other times unexpectedly peculiarly funny or touching.  At times it seems as if the “you” the narrator refers to is really himself.

Certainly, the man’s story allows readers a view of individuals who are swept along by modernity in a part of the world many of us may know less about.

If you are curious how Hamid’s work was viewed by critics from the U.S. and from India, see a recent review NPR’s Steve Inskeep of March 6, 2013 and from IANS/The Times of India of Oct. 10, 2013.

Written by lantanalister1

October 12, 2013 at 4:39 pm

Posted in Book Corner, Fiction

Tagged with , , , , ,

Friends of the Lantana Public Library 2012-2013 Book Discussion Group

leave a comment »

Hi everyone.

Here is the schedule for the Friends Book Discussion Group.  This year again we will feature Florida writers.  Thanks to Teresa Wilhelm for organizing this series.

Written by lantanalister1

November 6, 2012 at 8:59 pm

New: In the Garden of Beasts: Love, Terror, and an American Family in Hitler’s Berlin by Erik Larson

leave a comment »

In the Garden of Beasts: Love, Terror, and an American Family in Hitler’s Berlin by Erik Larson
[Hardcover] 448 pages.
Crown Publishers, 2011.
Lantana Public Library Call No. 943.086 Lar

In this historical fiction of American Ambassador William E. Dodd,   appointed to serve in Hitler’s Germany by FDR from 1933 to 1937, Eric Larson re-opens one of the most futile, ominous, and turbulent periods in American diplomatic history and a family that would be under relentless public spotlight thereafter.  The novel’s title alludes to the famous Tiergarten or Animal Garden in Central Berlin, opposite the Dodds’ residence at the time.

Dodd’s background seemed somewhat suited to such a difficult post. He had led a distinguished academic career, had trained at the University of Leipzig for his professorship, had taught in Virginia, and also had headed the University of Chicago’s Department of History (his interests were in the American South, the Civil War, Jeffersonian Democracy and Wilsonian international cooperation).  He also advised President Woodrow Wilson during the Paris Peace Conference and favored U.S. participation in the newly created League of Nations (though the U.S. never would join).

However, as Adolf Hitler had come to power in Germany through the ballot box, it is doubtful that diplomatic pressures could deflect Hitler from his chosen course as ‘The Invincible Fuhrer’.  Thus Dodd was unsuited to either understanding or influencing Hitler’s chosen course as outlined in ‘Mein Kampf’. On a personal basis, (in)famous daughter Martha Dodd (later Stern)’s frivolous conduct with a Russian Intelligence operative ultimately led to his death by execution. Other of her personal relationships also serve to highlight American impotence in the face of draconian measures of Nazi Germany.

For more, read Janet Maslin’s May 19, 2011, NY Times book review.

(Written with the help of Arminta M. Burns, volunteer)

Written by lantanalister1

May 27, 2012 at 5:31 pm